#1 (permalink)  
Old 04-19-2012, 07:15 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Las Vegas Nevada
Posts: 2,416
Default Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild

As some of you know I pulled a EJ25D DOHC from a 1998 subaru Legacy Outback. Before I get any farther into the rebuild I thought I should bring you up to speed with whats already been done.

Most of the parts have been cleaned and seal before the move to the cars new home but there is still some cleaning to be done.

The motor is back from the machine shop and here is what was done.
Cylinders were bore .020 over. You only have two options std bore and .020 over.
Pistons, Crank, Rods were balanced.
Deck was resurfaced
Heads were resufaced
Valve job (included replacement of guides)
Main Bearings
Rod Bearings
Wrist pins
Rings
Cast Pistons (this motor already has 100 more hp stock than a VW motor so it will remain mostly stock and just blue printed so performance parts will be kept to a minimum) cast pistons are lighter than forged pistons anyway

Total cost from the machine shop is around $1000

Cometic Gasket kit ordered $300

New OEM Case bolts with special washer $70

New Head bolts (req for a rebuild) $50

New timming belt kit complete w/water pump $200

New valves and springs. Ordered them a while back. Don't remember the cost.
The valves and springs are being replaced because the valves were worn and instead of regrinding them I choose to replace them and the springs didn't meet specs.
Before These are installed I'll cover how to check them to make sure they are within specifications.

Waiting for the rest of the parts to come in for the rebuild. When they get here we'll start with the rebuild

So thats an update as to where I'm at right now. Also my main computer isn't up and running yet so I need to get it going first to post pictures.

Brett
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-25-2012, 08:59 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Las Vegas Nevada
Posts: 2,416
Default

For those waiting for this rebuild to start here's the hold up.

My computer that I use for down loading pictures is in the shop and my wife dropped the camera and broke it(I manage to put it together and get it working but it doesn't take pictures like it did before)

The valve springs have been tested for tension and measured for free length and as soon as I get my computer back I'll start posting that and other things to check before installing the valves and springs.

Brett
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-30-2012, 01:51 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Las Vegas Nevada
Posts: 2,416
Default

I just had a costly lesson.

If your rebuilding a subaru get their gasket kit. It costs around $350 and includes every gasket, o'ring, and seal except for the o'rings for the fuel injectors.

I just spent an additional $220 for the o'rings and seals that didn't come in the cometic gasket kit. OUCH! Some of the seals in the cometic kit were wrong yet the box said it was for the year that I have.

Subaru is really proud of their o'rings and seals. The parts guy said that they don't bother with rebuilding engines. It cost less to just throw in a short block.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-30-2012, 08:07 PM
letterman7's Avatar
Honorary Admin
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Downingtown, PA
Posts: 3,702
Blog Entries: 6
Default

Ouch... I guess it depends where they get their crate shortblocks from. Might be a nice source to find out for someone wanting to do a build!
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2012, 08:55 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Las Vegas Nevada
Posts: 2,416
Default

When you consider how many hours of labor it takes to rebuild an engine that alone would exceed the cost of a short block.

First thing to know about rebuilding an engine is to keep it clean. Think of it as doing surgery. You don't want a doctor doing open heart surgery on you with dirty hands and dust in the air. Same with rebuilding an engine.
When you get the engine back from the machine shop give everything a good cleaning. Even if its been hot tanked. Remove all the oil plugs and wash out the oil passages. As I get each part cleaned (metal parts)I coat it with WD40 or the oil that will be used in the engine and then I wrap it in stretch wrap and cacoon it to keep it clean till I will need it or I put the parts in a zip lock bags .


Dirt I got out from valve guides
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-033.jpg


Dirt that came off the valve springs(they came in a sealed package)
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-001.jpg


Valve springs cleaned and now sealed in zip lock bag till I install them
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-010.jpg


Heads cleaned and cacooned in stretch wrap
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-007.jpg

So rule #1 Keep it clean
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 05-02-2012, 02:44 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Las Vegas Nevada
Posts: 2,416
Default

Cams are checked to see if they meet factory specifications

Cam Height is checked on all of the cams
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-049.jpg


Cam Base circle is checked on all of the cams
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-047.jpg

Journals are checked also
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-055.jpg

Valve Spring height is checked
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-rebuild-006.jpg

Valve Spring squareness is checked
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-rebuild-005.jpg

Valve spring tension is checked at closed position and open position
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-rebuild-003.jpg
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 05-02-2012, 05:36 PM
letterman7's Avatar
Honorary Admin
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Downingtown, PA
Posts: 3,702
Blog Entries: 6
Default

You've done this before, haven't you? You're already way more into it than I could ever feel comfortable with. With your attention to detail, Brett, the engine doesn't stand a chance of failure!
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2012, 10:04 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Las Vegas Nevada
Posts: 2,416
Default

Quote:
You've done this before, haven't you?
That book Engine rebuilding for Dummies was sure worth the money Just kidding
Everything that I'm doing can be found in books. What I'm doing here is close to blue printing an engine.
Checking out the valve springs ensures that all of the springs are appling the same loads on the valves. Most of the original springs that were in the engine failed so I just replaced them all.

Check out the valve springs. Their progressively wound. Thats cool(I think). You want to stay away from stiff valve springs unless the cam your using calls out for them. Too stiff of springs cause excessive wear and friction.It may sound cool to put them in but unless you need them they could cost you hp. With the progressive springs, pressure increases at a progressive rate as the valve opens so less effort is needed to open them and when the valve is fully open you have the pressure needed to not have the valves float.


Plastigage is used to measure cam and crank journal tolerances
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-017.jpg


Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-021.jpg


plastigage in place. The cap is installed and tightened to factory specs
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-019.jpg

Cap is then removed and the plastigage is measured
Sterling#S009 EJ25D Rebuild-ej25d-023.jpg
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2012, 07:04 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Las Vegas Nevada
Posts: 2,416
Default

Here's something important I found out today.
You have to use Subaru rod and crank bearings in these engines.

I found this out today when the bearings that the machine shop sold me didn't meet factory tolerances. This is a good reason why you do it yourself and check everything and not leave anything to chance. If I would have just thrown it together with out checking anything this engine would of had a short life span.

It started first when I was checking the tolerances to the bushing for the piston pin in the rod. Those weren't in tolerance and then I started to check the big end of the rod and that was out.
The rods are back at the machine shop having new upper bushings installed.

What you do is measure the main and rod journals on the crank then take that measurement and look it up on a chart in the factory service manual and it will tell you which bearing size to use for that journal. They have 5 different sizes for the rod and crank and sizes change by incruments of .0005 (I think it was).

So another leason learned

Brett
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2012, 09:14 PM
letterman7's Avatar
Honorary Admin
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Downingtown, PA
Posts: 3,702
Blog Entries: 6
Default

Ah, so the machine shop had bearings that appeared the same, had the same basic dimensions, but tolerances were off? How do you know what bearings to get if there are 5 different sizes? Is it possible that each journal is off by that amount?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
LinkBack
LinkBack URL LinkBack URL
About LinkBacks About LinkBacks