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Old 08-13-2012, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by letterman7 View Post
Don't get ahead of yourself talking turbos when you don't even know about the basics of VW engines yet. Clean everything up - get the crud off the block, clean the air filters and put some gas in the tank, or run a remote gas tank to the fuel pump. It looks like this:
Attachment 2641
Top nipple is the outlet to the carbs, bottom to the fuel tank. Get some help with hooking up the distributor and the starter to a battery and crank it over - my bet is it'll crank for a minute or two and fire right up. If you want to play it safe, pull the spark plugs and squirt a shot of WD40 down the cylinder so it isn't dry cranking. Check the oil first, of course, before you venture into doing this.
There is absolutely no need to randomly start replacing parts. You're suffering from the 'new owner syndrome' where you want to fix everything before knowing what's broke. The only thing I replaced when I bought my first Sterling was the starter. And really, the seller replaced it before I got to his house, but I reimbursed him for it. The car literally sat for 15 years in the same spot - dry rotted tires, engine not set up and stored properly - in his garage. The day I came to pick it up he swapped the starter, we put some fuel in the tank and down the carb throats, hand cranked it to get the oil flowing and started it up - five tries and the engine fired right over. Yes, the carbs needed a rebuild, but it ran. And after I rebuilt those carbs that's the way I ran the car ever since - no other engine mods at all.
Get someone over that knows aircooled engines one weekend. Get some sandwiches and some drinks and have them go through the car with you. Remember the old adage: if it ain't broke, don't fix it. And don't think about turbos right now. There are kits out there, but you'll need to change a bunch of stuff to make it work.
thank you for the words of wisdom lol and thank you for your history of the engine my story is very much the same(probably why i have N.O.S. so bad) also, thank you for the picture, i had a concern about that when i was looking at my setup a few days ago vs the picture i have from when i got the car, the gentleman that "rebuilt" my engine hooked the carbs up reverse what you have just told me and i noticed it in my picture as well. as for the turbo, im really not looking for one right now just a curiosity for my "things to look into" section on my binder. one more question, do you know what the piece on the top of the block on the drivers side of the center pull linkage is? it has 2 hose ports on it one straight and the other gay..wait i mean bent, at a 90degree towards the passenger side? i had a picture to post but my phone decided to fail completely
thanks,
Caleb
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Old 08-13-2012, 05:40 PM
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Can't tell from your initial photo of the engine. Might just be a breather box, although you already have one on the firewall. Follow the hoses and see where they go.

As for the fuel pump... there are different brands. It may be hosed correctly - easy test, take both hoses off and squirt some WD40 in the lower port. Turn the engine over by hand (with a socket on the crank pulley - big pulley at the bottom of the engine). If the WD oozes out the top, then you know that the bottom is in, top out. If it comes back out the bottom... there you go! The WD won't hurt any gas you put in there and may momentarily lube the pump diaphragm!
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Old 08-14-2012, 01:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by letterman7 View Post
Can't tell from your initial photo of the engine. Might just be a breather box, although you already have one on the firewall. Follow the hoses and see where they go.

As for the fuel pump... there are different brands. It may be hosed correctly - easy test, take both hoses off and squirt some WD40 in the lower port. Turn the engine over by hand (with a socket on the crank pulley - big pulley at the bottom of the engine). If the WD oozes out the top, then you know that the bottom is in, top out. If it comes back out the bottom... there you go! The WD won't hurt any gas you put in there and may momentarily lube the pump diaphragm!
My phone is now (out of no where) working again, so here is the object that im clueless about (BTW there are no hoses to or from right now kind of my main issue with it)
Attached Thumbnails
BOSCH Coil electronic ignition issue-top-block.jpg   BOSCH Coil electronic ignition issue-question-mark.jpg  
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:49 AM
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That confirms my suspicion from your other post about removing the tank. I saw what appeared to be a remote oil cooler over the driver's rear tire - this confirms that. It's a block off plate over the oil feeds from the engine - it's directing hoses to the cooler. That cutout in the cooling tins is where the stock oil cooler would mount. It's ok to have a remote cooler, as long as it's getting the air movement it needs; The problem I see with yours is that big gaping hold where it once was. That needs to be sealed somehow to keep that cylinder from cooking. I might look into putting the stock cooler back in. Check the Samba classifieds to see what's there: the oil cooler TheSamba.com :: VW Classifieds - NOS type 3 oil cooler
TheSamba.com :: VW Classifieds - Type 3 Oil Cooler w/ Fittings

It appears that you have the stock tins, which is good. This is what a stock setup looks like with a regular cooler installed:
BOSCH Coil electronic ignition issue-t3-oil-cooler.jpg
BOSCH Coil electronic ignition issue-t3-oil-cooler-2.jpg

And here's what it looks like with the tins off:
BOSCH Coil electronic ignition issue-t3-oil-cooler-3.jpg

You can use the remote cooler - just make sure there is a fan or something to get air blowing through it (or move it so it's in the air stream when the car is moving). You'll need to fabricate some sort of plate to seal that hole as best you can, though. Any lost cooling air to that cylinder is going to be an issue.
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Last edited by letterman7; 08-14-2012 at 08:02 AM.
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