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Old 08-10-2012, 04:06 PM
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Default BOSCH Coil electronic ignition issue

im looking at beefing up my entire system including a gene/alternator swap, nicer more efficient coil, distributer, and so on. i dont currently have my ignition set up so im open minded. in reading, most people have agreed that the Bosch parts (coil and alternator specificly) are on the top of the list. while searching these Coils i see that it says "DOES NOT WORK WITH FACTORY ELECTRONIC IGNITIONS!"
( Vintage VW Parts | COIL | Coil, 12 Volt Bosch Blue w/Bracket | 00012 ) Now, my question is, does this mean it would not work with an aftermarket E.ignition? ( Vintage VW Parts | ELECTRONIC IGNITION KITS | Accu-Fire Electronic Ignition | ZVW905067 ) maybe i just dont know enough about coils to understand hows whats and whys lol
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Old 08-10-2012, 05:13 PM
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Setting up new stuff is always a good idea if there is any question on it's wear. Yes, the standard coil meant for points type ignition systems will not work with factory electronics - meaning the later fuel injected cars. I don't know why but I imagine it has something to do with the resistance voltage, but don't quote me on that. The aftermarket Accufire will work just fine with a Bosch coil, though many people upgrade the coils to an aftermarket to match the electronics CB Performance - Online Catalog

I've never run electronic ignition, but know several people that do and they love 'em. The only downside is when they fail, they fail without warning and could potentially leave you stranded. Always carry a spare set of points with you just in case.
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Old 08-10-2012, 08:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by letterman7 View Post
Setting up new stuff is always a good idea if there is any question on it's wear. Yes, the standard coil meant for points type ignition systems will not work with factory electronics - meaning the later fuel injected cars. I don't know why but I imagine it has something to do with the resistance voltage, but don't quote me on that. The aftermarket Accufire will work just fine with a Bosch coil, though many people upgrade the coils to an aftermarket to match the electronics CB Performance - Online Catalog

I've never run electronic ignition, but know several people that do and they love 'em. The only downside is when they fail, they fail without warning and could potentially leave you stranded. Always carry a spare set of points with you just in case.

what ignition to you run in your set ups? id love something that wont leave any chance at stranding me lol and just to be clear, the bosch wont work? but the accufire will?
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:22 PM
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The Bosch coils will be fine with the Accufire electronic ignition. I've always run points... no real reason, just never got around to changing over to an electronic point system - which is all the Accufire is. Don't get the terminology confused - "electronic ignition" spans quite a bit.

As for the stranding stories... they are out there. It's somewhat rare, but when it happens you hear about it on the boards. Carry a spare electronics set or a set of points to put into the distributor if it happens, or be prepared to have the car towed. Like most imported electronics, some can be dodgy, some will last forever.
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Old 08-10-2012, 11:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by letterman7 View Post
The Bosch coils will be fine with the Accufire electronic ignition. I've always run points... no real reason, just never got around to changing over to an electronic point system - which is all the Accufire is. Don't get the terminology confused - "electronic ignition" spans quite a bit.

As for the stranding stories... they are out there. It's somewhat rare, but when it happens you hear about it on the boards. Carry a spare electronics set or a set of points to put into the distributor if it happens, or be prepared to have the car towed. Like most imported electronics, some can be dodgy, some will last forever.

just curious, and sort of out on the limb here(still dont know alot even after all of your help) would any of these wires come in a wire harness for the whole vehicle? im planning on purchasing the deluxe wiring kit from sterling, not really sure what that would wire in the engine? i know it sounds like a stupid question but any help is great as always.
Caleb
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Old 08-11-2012, 10:32 AM
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You're confusing the terminology with what you're looking at. The Accufire is simply a module that drops into the distributor - nothing else changes. A factory VW electronic ignition has a computer and a harness to control the fuel injection - your car does not have any of that. The harness from Sterling Sports is a generic wire harness that can be used for any vehicle. All the wires are pre-labeled, so it's a matter of almost plug and play. But you have to know how to wire basic systems, like the steering column and starter circuit. Like I mentioned, find a local VW club and someone that runs a dune buggy. It's very likely that they don't have the factory loom, but are using something aftermarket.
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Old 08-13-2012, 02:31 AM
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thank you for straighting me out on that haha. and thank you for the samba link to car clubs, iv actually talked with quit a few people at some car shows lately and found their club on samba so now i just gotta get someone out to my place to tell me what the hells going on in my engine i had a lot of pictures to post on here from yesterday for my entire car(engine pics, gas tank, suspension, carbs, distributor, so on and so forth) but my phone just went haywire and now i have no telly but i can tell you, i have (or at least in searching google with the part numbers i found) the Solex H40/44EIS dual port carbs. The full number on my carbs(all numbers and letters i could find excluding jets) was Solex 40-28 H40/44EIS BROSOL IND Bras if my research is correct, i have a 28mm Venturis but a 40/44 carb essentially? Kadron carbs? people say good things about them i.e. there easy to rebuild, maintain, above average performance, and great for low budget? do you know if any of this proves true or false?
and as ill always say,
Thank you
caleb
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Old 08-13-2012, 08:57 AM
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One of the most popular aftermarket carburetors there is. Very easy to maintain and tune. If they engine is running well, don't mess with them. Here's a link to one of the specialty tuners for those models: The Low Bugget and Mr.Kadron web site. Another specialty tuner are these guys: Kadron Solex H40/44 EIS Carburetor Specialists, Repair, Rebuild, and Rebushing... Parts and Service
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Old 08-13-2012, 03:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by letterman7 View Post
One of the most popular aftermarket carburetors there is. Very easy to maintain and tune. If they engine is running well, don't mess with them. Here's a link to one of the specialty tuners for those models: The Low Bugget and Mr.Kadron web site. Another specialty tuner are these guys: Kadron Solex H40/44 EIS Carburetor Specialists, Repair, Rebuild, and Rebushing... Parts and Service

sweet! its good to know haha as for the engine...the block has been rebuilt but that was over a year ago now and i have NOT ran the engine even once...im not sure what ON the block works and doesnt(sort of why im wanting to just replace EVERYTHING) and it has no electrical as of right now. Really need to know what battery to get? guessing that it was a 12v but not sure of any sprecific numbers or anything. i have a type 3 1600 "pancake", currently using a generator but wish to swap for an alt(not sure which one or even if i can) and wanting to upgrade the distributor and ignition coil. carbs SEEM good (i push the center pull linkage and both floats open) but the spring i have is not attached to anything so it doesnt close on its own. carbs will probably need to be cleaned? While im ranting, perhaps now would be a good time to ask about turbo kits ? anyone know if they were made for this engine and if so is there any way to fit one in our confined space? (i have a sterling)
Thanks always,
Caleb
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Old 08-13-2012, 03:28 PM
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Don't get ahead of yourself talking turbos when you don't even know about the basics of VW engines yet. Clean everything up - get the crud off the block, clean the air filters and put some gas in the tank, or run a remote gas tank to the fuel pump. It looks like this:
BOSCH Coil electronic ignition issue-t3-pump.jpg
Top nipple is the outlet to the carbs, bottom to the fuel tank. Get some help with hooking up the distributor and the starter to a battery and crank it over - my bet is it'll crank for a minute or two and fire right up. If you want to play it safe, pull the spark plugs and squirt a shot of WD40 down the cylinder so it isn't dry cranking. Check the oil first, of course, before you venture into doing this.
There is absolutely no need to randomly start replacing parts. You're suffering from the 'new owner syndrome' where you want to fix everything before knowing what's broke. The only thing I replaced when I bought my first Sterling was the starter. And really, the seller replaced it before I got to his house, but I reimbursed him for it. The car literally sat for 15 years in the same spot - dry rotted tires, engine not set up and stored properly - in his garage. The day I came to pick it up he swapped the starter, we put some fuel in the tank and down the carb throats, hand cranked it to get the oil flowing and started it up - five tries and the engine fired right over. Yes, the carbs needed a rebuild, but it ran. And after I rebuilt those carbs that's the way I ran the car ever since - no other engine mods at all.
Get someone over that knows aircooled engines one weekend. Get some sandwiches and some drinks and have them go through the car with you. Remember the old adage: if it ain't broke, don't fix it. And don't think about turbos right now. There are kits out there, but you'll need to change a bunch of stuff to make it work.
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