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Old 07-01-2010, 10:09 AM
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I agree (about adjusting the spring plate angle). I did that with my Manx and swore I'd never do it again. Broke several strut spring compressors trying to collapse the plates, bent a farm jack (with chain welded to the foot) trying to re-set said plates onto their stops and generally created a mess. And learned a whole new cuss word vocabulary in the process...
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:18 AM
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I hope you didn't get hurt! I had a scissor jack fall over doing it...there's a lotta twist on those bars!

BTW - how does one determine how long his torsion shafts are in order to buy the correct adjustable spring plates, since they are ordered by rod length? I wouldn't have thought the torsions shaft length would make any difference!
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:47 AM
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Long rod = IRS rear; short rod = swingaxle

According to the CIP1 site:

Note: All adjustable spring plates are made to use the short (21 3/4) torsion bars. This is a stock torsion bar for the 1960-68 beetle with the solid 4 bolt torsion cap. (with no hole in center). When changing over you well also need to use our torsion cap # ACC-C10-4055 to replace your old ones with the hole. On the later model IRS dog leg (trailing /swing arm ) the bolt pattern is slightly different - and therefor you will need to drill one extra hole for proper installation. Will provide approx. 1-1/2 to 2 inches of adjustability.


But then, CB Performance lists various years with options and their plates seem to be heavier duty... and pricier: CB Performance - Online Catalog A phone call to either tech department with your year chassis would certainly narrow it down.
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Old 07-06-2010, 07:34 AM
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If I only knew what year chasis it was...the title is for a re-cconstruction, with no reference. If Amore was only still in business...
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Old 07-06-2010, 01:55 PM
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That's the easy part - post the VIN number, located on top of the tunnel. You can decode it from there using this chart: TheSamba.com :: Beetle VIN numbers
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Old 07-07-2010, 10:28 AM
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...Top of the tunnel by the rear beam, and shift linkage as I recall (?) My linkage cover is literally a piece of plywood bolted down. It has a number inked on it, so that might be the VIN itself! I'll check the tunnel for the stamping also.
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Old 07-07-2010, 10:56 AM
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Yup, in front of the shifter link, about 4 inches or so. It should sit in a small indentation in the metal, visible as a gentle crease under your plywood!
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Old 07-08-2010, 08:16 AM
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118533017 = Jan/Feb 1968. It was written on top of the plywood! Now to the torsion bar length...
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Old 07-08-2010, 10:11 AM
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I got the reply from Pacific Customs, the cheapest priced adjustable spring plate provider:

Well 68 was the last year of swing axle and 69 was the first year of IRS. IRS never had short bars ( that don't stick through the torsion cover ). So that means over the time of that pan, someone has done some changes other than stock. Assuming it is IRS and short bars this is what you'll need:

I provided these specs:

It's IRS (one knuckle on the half axle, at the TA), and I the cover is solid. I'm not at the car, but will verify tonight.

Is this a "Swing Axle" car? Maybe I don't understand the swing designation.
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Old 07-08-2010, 12:25 PM
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Actually, '68 was the changeover year with IRS coming in midway through the production run. An IRS rear has two very distinct knuckles, one at the backing plate on the wheel side and one on the transaxle side. The drive axle is only about an inch and an eighth thick. Swingaxles have only one "knuckle" at the transaxle side, covered with a large boot. Those drive axle tubes are about 2 1/2" thick and terminate inside the backing plate on the rear wheel. It's called swing axle because only one side of the axle pivots - the transaxle side.
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