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Old 08-29-2013, 09:47 PM
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Default engine upgrade

I am looking for new engine for my sterling. I currently have a stock 1600 and would like to go up to maybe a 1914 or somewhere in that area.

I want to stay with air cooled and I would like to have dual carbs.

Does anyone have any advice or leads on where to look?

I do not want a speed demon I just would like chirp the tires a little once in a while and be able to handle a hill without winding it all the way out and constantly down shifting and sounding like I am struggling to reach the top.

Thanks, Matthew
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Old 08-30-2013, 12:52 AM
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All I have experience with is my 1600, sorry. if you get something bigger and have interest in selling your 1600 let me know
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Old 08-30-2013, 07:58 AM
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I have a type II 1641cc stage three and dual DellOrto 40s, 4-1-2 exhaust by Ahnendorp B.A.S. (Not State side but the best by far). only thing standard is the dizzy drive, about 110BHP and 6,000rpm+ so I don't change down at all. A look at their web will give you some ideas (and give your wallet the screaming habdabs ) Ahnendorp B.A.S.
Here in the EU we tend to go for smaller, higher revving engines rather than rely on shear size. Going any bigger than 1641cc kit will mean machining your case or buying a modified case to take the bigger barrels/stroke. If money is no problem, (lucky you) then buy a big CC engine ready built.

Chirco in Arizona are well up on VWs too and very helpful.
Chirco Performance & Restoration - VW Parts and Accessories for your Bug - Tech Articles

With a 1951cc kit at $1,700 (plus machining and inserts) and a complete guaranteed engine at $2,922.90 and performance at $3,237.90 I know what I would go for, new engine.

Over 2110cc is not for every day driver.
Ya pays ya money and takes ya choice.
Peter

GEX deleted , you live and learn

Last edited by Peter; 08-30-2013 at 08:36 PM.
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Old 08-30-2013, 09:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter View Post
Oh GOD no! Do not ever purchase a GEX product ever. Can I emphasis that enough? Go to the Samba and search 'GEX engines' and read the horror stories from real owners.

Finding an engine builder can be tricky. One of the best in the country is CB Performance, and you get what you pay for. Somewhat locally to you is Acme Car Co in New Cumberland, PA (just southeast of Harrisburg) that sells both engines and transmissions. Mixed reviews on their stuff, though. If you're a confident machinist or know someone who is, you can purchase big bore kits through SCAT as well as complete engines. SCAT has been around forever and has a pretty good record, and oddly, long blocks and complete engines can be bought through JC Whitney...

Size? Personally, a 1914 is as large as I would want to go for a somewhat daily driver. Any larger than that starts to have issues with cooling and other assorted problems. Re-read your question from 9-9 of last year. You may even want to consider swapping to a type 4 engine as I did, if nothing just for the torque output. Even as a base 1800 my engine has plenty of power to conquer some local hills even in 4th gear. And t4's can be built much bigger than a t1 engine, if that's your thing!

Don't forget, with more power (comes more responsibility.. sorry, couldn't resist), comes a chance that you'll need to change gear sets to take advantage of it.
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Old 08-30-2013, 11:04 PM
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Please tell me I did not mess up.

I just purchased an origional equipment running type 4 1800cc engine that came out of a 1975 VW Vanagon.

Below is a portion of the ad from which I purchased the engine.

"I am in the process of completely restoring a 1975 V-W Vanagon. I placed an order for a new GEX replacement engine in April but it did not get installed until this past July. Meanwhile, I replaced the complete distributer tower, high tension wires and spark plugs on the original engine and drove the 1975 Vanagon 4,000 miles round trip from Maine to Houston, Texas. As soon as I got back to Maine I made a 2,200 mile round trip to Western Pennsylvania. BOTH trips were made without a breakdown or incident. Upon return from Pennsylvania I had the new GEX engine installed. See Picture."

I hope I don't have to cut my rear valance to make it fit like Rick did.

My rear valance is a custom job and maybe it has some extra room.

Rick can you tell me what other complications you may have ran into?

Rick (Letterman) I value your opinions and statements and I am eagerly awaiting your input.
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Old 08-31-2013, 09:35 AM
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If it's the OE engine from the Vanagon, you should be fine. Sounds like it's the fuel injected version too, which is nice, if you were able to get it complete with the computer. If I had it to do again, I would have put the fuel injection back on, oddly, just for the simplicity sake. Or get a free-standing FI system from CB Performance.

In any case, I'd just got over the engine with a fine tooth comb just to make sure nothing is amiss. Find someone in your area that knows type 4 engines and see if they could at least pull the heads and make sure they aren't warped and the valves are good. Since you really don't have a history on it and it's still out of the car, a top end rebuild wouldn't be a bad idea - valve seats, deck the heads, that sort of thing. Spend a little money now and save problems later. The lower end of these engines usually are in pretty good shape even if they were abused.

The only "real" issue I ran into so far was my rebuilder re-used the old valve drivetrain and didn't check the valve adjusters. Those had been hammered flat over the years and was giving me issues with adjustments and a constant tap. I filed mine to where they resemble an OE dome, and I also picked up a new set to put in on the next adjustment.

As for fitting.. the first thing you'll want to do is convert the oil fill from the bottom fill where that long tube comes off the pan to a top fill like a Porsche 914. That involves some drilling of the case for the dipstick, but really, it's not so bad. Just a little nerve racking if you've never done it before Since the motor is out and you'll want to go through it anyway, that should be an easy conversion. Other than that, I can't say if you'll need to "adjust" your rear valance as I've never seen it in person. It looks like it's a little longer than the stock setup, but I don't know what's behind it. The only way you're going to find out is to stick the engine underneath!
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Old 09-01-2013, 12:39 AM
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Actually, got to thinking on this today. I did not do this to my engine because of the plans I had for it, but you could and not worry about the rear valance clearance issue. Purchase an upright conversion kit. Takes that large fan off the front and puts a T1 style shroud, fan and alternator in it's place.

AircooledTech.com - T-4 Upright Conversion
SuperBeetles.Com
VW Air-cooled | Upright Cooling Conversion for Type-4 Engine (CSP)
and from the T4 man himself, Jake Raby: Vintage VW Volkswagen Type 4 DTM V1 Cooling System Kit | eBay
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Old 09-04-2013, 02:06 AM
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Thanks for the information and links, I will look into this.
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Old 09-04-2013, 08:25 AM
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Is the Sterling engine compartment tighter than the Sebring? I have the 1.7 L in my and it does not look like they had to cut anything for it. From what I have read heat exchangers and exhaust are interchangeable between 1.7 and 1.8 so I would think they were the same physical dimensions.
engine upgrade-dsc00014.jpg
engine upgrade-dsc00015.jpg
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Old 09-04-2013, 08:46 AM
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Much tighter. The Sebring bodies are a little wider in the back in the engine compartment (at least the Sebring II). The only differences in the exhaust were the port shapes; later engines had square shaped ports, early had oval.

And congratulations, Poptop... you've got a Porsche engine in yours
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