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Old 09-09-2011, 10:39 PM
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Default cimbria engine cooling

I have a gen 1 cimbria ss built in 1976. The original owner built the car drove it for 18 miles and parked it in his garage. It needs a master and wheel cylinders and a rebuild on the solexes to drive. The stewart warner odometer says 18 miles on it as well as his story. The pan is a 1974 vw that has 18000 on it.
The bug rolled. The motor was went through has a mild cam upgraded to two 40 mil solexes and distributor upgrade as well 89 mil jugs too. It also has headers as well that run through the engine compartment. Exhaust through the rear of the body.

Oh by the way it was registered and insured so no worries there.

Ok here is the question. Cimbria's are rumored to overheat the motors. My 1600 has all the tins but not a floor . Will I have problems.

I plan to flip the headers to get them out of the engine compartment get rid of the open exhaust( glass packs with no guts) and make it semi quiet. I am definitely going to wrap the headers too. Then I am planning on making a floor.

VeeVilliage in Kansas city tells me that i must put a floor in it or cook the engine.
If I do that I think I need to add air ducts and a exit for air to enter and exit and possibly cooling fans to keep air moving in the engine bay when I am not moving.

what is the truth and what do I really need to do.

thanks Dale
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Old 09-09-2011, 10:53 PM
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That's always been the rumor, especially if your car is the style with the Mangusta type rear hatch. It would make sense, though I personally never heard of anyone that owned a Gen1 having issues. That said, the more air you can flow into the engine compartment, the better you're going to be. Definitely keep all the tins in place and if you can build the "bottom" part of the engine bay to separate the top half of the engine from the bottom, the better off you'll be. My Sterling is/was the same way - the PO had a custom exhaust system that crossed right behind the crank pulley and inside the engine bay. On long trips the engine temp rose dramatically. I wrapped the pipes and placed flexible heat blankets around the motor in an effort to minimize the heat soak - I haven't had a chance to really run the car since to see if it made a difference, but on short trips I can physically feel the difference in heat when I stop and get out.

VeeVillage has a point... to a point. Kit cars are notorious for having poor air circulation in their engine bays. Duct more air in from whatever access points you have (even if you have to add a fan or two), make sure the hot air has a place to leave (preferably out the back or out the top of the engine hatch) and you should be fine, as long as the rest of the motor is tuned properly. You could always add an external oil cooler, strung somewhere in the airstream. You'll just have to figure out how to seal it off in the winter time if you plan to run the car.
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Old 09-09-2011, 11:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by letterman7 View Post
That's always been the rumor, especially if your car is the style with the Mangusta type rear hatch. It would make sense, though I personally never heard of anyone that owned a Gen1 having issues. That said, the more air you can flow into the engine compartment, the better you're going to be. Definitely keep all the tins in place and if you can build the "bottom" part of the engine bay to separate the top half of the engine from the bottom, the better off you'll be. My Sterling is/was the same way - the PO had a custom exhaust system that crossed right behind the crank pulley and inside the engine bay. On long trips the engine temp rose dramatically. I wrapped the pipes and placed flexible heat blankets around the motor in an effort to minimize the heat soak - I haven't had a chance to really run the car since to see if it made a difference, but on short trips I can physically feel the difference in heat when I stop and get out.

VeeVillage has a point... to a point. Kit cars are notorious for having poor air circulation in their engine bays. Duct more air in from whatever access points you have (even if you have to add a fan or two), make sure the hot air has a place to leave (preferably out the back or out the top of the engine hatch) and you should be fine, as long as the rest of the motor is tuned properly. You could always add an external oil cooler, strung somewhere in the airstream. You'll just have to figure out how to seal it off in the winter time if you plan to run the car.
Is the Mangusta hatch the one with the two small slits under the two rear glasses
that is my type. I also have the short doors and exposed hinges

let me know how that works out for you.
I will send pics of my progress

In the past I have built and repaired scca race cars sheet metal fab and fiberglass is no stranger to me.

off topic

Have you ever rode in 1 gen cimbria. It seems like I won't have much of a reference to the road. It will probably be spring time before I get all the kinks worked out of the car but I am exited to drive it.
thanks again dale

Last edited by delbertinie; 09-09-2011 at 11:27 PM.
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Old 09-10-2011, 09:54 AM
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Not in a Gen 1, but I'd imagine that a Sterling is very close. You get used to it after a while!
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